Tiger poem

What the hand, dare seize the fire? In "The Tyger" he presents a poem of "triumphant human awareness" and "a hymn to pure being", according to Kazin. What the hammer?

The tyger william blake analysis line by line

Comparing the creator to a blacksmith, he ponders about the anvil and the furnace that the project would have required and the smith who could have wielded them. Kazin says to begin to wonder about the tiger, and its nature, can only lead to a daring to wonder about it. What the hand, dare seize the fire? Did he who made the Lamb make thee? Finally, the sixth restates the central question while raising the stakes; rather than merely question who or what "could" create the Tyger, the speaker wonders: who dares. And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? Form The poem is comprised of six quatrains in rhymed couplets. Themes and critical analysis[ edit ] "The Tyger" is the sister poem to " The Lamb " from " Songs of Innocence " , a reflection of similar ideas from a different perspective Blake's concept of "contraries" , with "The Lamb" bringing attention to innocence. The smithy represents a traditional image of artistic creation; here Blake applies it to the divine creation of the natural world. The simplicity and neat proportions of the poems form perfectly suit its regular structure, in which a string of questions all contribute to the articulation of a single, central idea. The speaker stands in awe of the tiger as a sheer physical and aesthetic achievement, even as he recoils in horror from the moral implications of such a creation; for the poem addresses not only the question of who could make such a creature as the tiger, but who would perform this act. In the forests of the night; What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry? Structure[ edit ] The first and last stanzas are identical except the word "could" becomes "dare" in the second iteration.

Burnt the fire of thine eyes? In the forests of the night; What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

The lamb poem

On what wings dare he aspire? The reference to the lamb in the penultimate stanza reminds the reader that a tiger and a lamb have been created by the same God, and raises questions about the implications of this. The second stanza questions "the Tyger" about where he was created; the third about how the creator formed him; the fourth about what tools were used. Much of the poem follows the metrical pattern of its first line and can be scanned as trochaic tetrameter catalectic. The smithy represents a traditional image of artistic creation; here Blake applies it to the divine creation of the natural world. What the hand, dare seize the fire? In what distant deeps or skies.

What kind of a God, then, could or would design such a terrifying beast as the tiger? In more general terms, what does the undeniable existence of evil and violence in the world tell us about the nature of God, and what does it mean to live in a world where a being can at once contain both beauty and horror?

What the anvil? What the hammer? And when the job was done, the speaker wonders, how would the creator have felt?

A number of lines, however, such as line four in the first stanza, fall into iambic tetrameter.

The tyger message

Comparing the creator to a blacksmith, he ponders about the anvil and the furnace that the project would have required and the smith who could have wielded them. What the hand, dare seize the fire? Did he who made the Lamb make thee? The speaker stands in awe of the tiger as a sheer physical and aesthetic achievement, even as he recoils in horror from the moral implications of such a creation; for the poem addresses not only the question of who could make such a creature as the tiger, but who would perform this act. What the anvil? What kind of a God, then, could or would design such a terrifying beast as the tiger? And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? What the anvil? Structure[ edit ] The first and last stanzas are identical except the word "could" becomes "dare" in the second iteration. Burnt the fire of thine eyes? In the forests of the night; What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In the fifth stanza, Blake wonders how the creator reacted to "the Tyger", and who created the creature. The tiger initially appears as a strikingly sensuous image.

Did he who made the Lamb make thee? In the fifth stanza, Blake wonders how the creator reacted to "the Tyger", and who created the creature.

funny tiger poems

The reference to the lamb in the penultimate stanza reminds the reader that a tiger and a lamb have been created by the same God, and raises questions about the implications of this.

Kazin says to begin to wonder about the tiger, and its nature, can only lead to a daring to wonder about it.

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SparkNotes: Songs of Innocence and Experience: “The Tyger”